ALT COPY
The optimism score for this study was created using methodology prescribed by the Life Orientation Test — Revised (LOT—Rii). This test was created by Carnegie Mellon University professors Michael Scheier and Michael Bridges and University of Miami professor Dr. Charles Carver. The sample size consisted of 2,002 Americans aged 18 and older and was fielded between Sept. 20 and Sept. 28, 2018. Scheier, M. F., Carver, C. S., & Bridges, M. W. (1994). Distinguishing optimism from neuroticism (and trait anxiety, self-mastery, and self-esteem): A re-evaluation of the Life Orientation Test. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, Retrieved from: http://local.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/sclLOT-R.html
ALT COPY
Optimism is a force to be reckoned with.
Our research shows that optimists are 7x as likely to experience better financial health and experience 145 fewer days of financial stress than pessimists. Fortunately, it’s a mindset that can be learned.
Take our five-minute quiz, developed by academic researchers, to discover your optimism score and see how it might be affecting your finances.
Optimism is a force to be reckoned with.
Our research shows that optimists are 7x as likely to experience better financial health and experience 145 fewer days of financial stress than pessimists. Fortunately, it’s a mindset that can be learned.
Take our five-minute quiz, developed by academic researchers, to discover your optimism score and see how it might be affecting your finances.
The optimism score for this study was created using methodology prescribed by the Life Orientation Test — Revised (LOT—Rii). This test was created by Carnegie Mellon University professors Michael Scheier and Michael Bridges and University of Miami professor Dr. Charles Carver. The sample size consisted of 2,002 Americans aged 18 and older and was fielded between Sept. 20 and Sept. 28, 2018. Scheier, M. F., Carver, C. S., & Bridges, M. W. (1994). Distinguishing optimism from neuroticism (and trait anxiety, self-mastery, and self-esteem): A re-evaluation of the Life Orientation Test. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, Retrieved from: http://local.psy.miami.edu/faculty/ccarver/sclLOT-R.html
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Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
In uncertain times, I usually expect the best.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
It’s easy for me to relax.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
If something can go wrong, it will.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
I’m always optimistic about my future.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
I enjoy my friends a lot.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
It’s important for me to keep busy.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
I hardly ever expect things to go my way.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
I don’t get upset too easily.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
I rarely count on good things happening to me.
Trust your instincts and answer honestly. There are no right or wrong answers.
Overall, I expect more good things to happen to me than bad.
What age group are you in?
What is your gender?
Where do you live?
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